Though these days the term wordmonger refers to "a writer or speaker who uses language pretentiously or carelessly," please join me in proposing a new meaning. A fishmonger appreciates and promotes fish, therefore, a wordmonger does the same for words.

Thursday, May 18, 2017

Shout!

Shout!


We English speakers have heaps of ways to raise our voices. Here are a few:

Shout has been a part of the language since the 1200s & has meant to call or cry out loudly that whole time. Its source is unclear, but it may be the root of shoot (when shouting, one throws one voice, a bit like one might “throw” an arrow or bullet). 

Yell has been a part of English since the beginning of English. It comes through Proto-Germanic from the Proto-Indo-European word *ghel-, which meant to shout out, sing or yell. We can see the sing meaning of *ghel- in the modern word nightingale, which causes me to appreciate that nightingales held onto this sing meaning of the word; nobody needs birds who yell.

The Old Norse word skr├Žkja made its way into English in the 1200s as scrycke,  which eventually became both the word screech, & the word shriek, meaning exactly that. Linguists are pretty sure it’s an imitative word.

Bellow appeared in English in the 1300s, meaning to roar. It came through Old English from a Proto-Indo-European word meaning the same thing.

A comparable late-comer to English is the word holler, meaning to shout. Holler didn’t appear until the 1690s, from an earlier form, hollar, which referred to the act of calling the hounds in from hunting.  A later shade of meaning denoted a style of singing popular at the time in the American South. Holler shares its roots with the word hello.

The modern digital equivalent of YELLING may have first been established in John Irving’s 1989 book, A Prayer for Owen Meany.

Ideas? Comments? Reactions? Please leave them in the comments section. YELL if you must.




4 comments:

  1. I'M WORKING ON A CHARACTER NAMED SCRYCKE YELLING FOR MY VERSION OF "SILENCE OF THE LAMBS." ALSO, I THINK SOMEONE (NOT ME) SHOULD TELL THE STORY OF HOLLAR BELLOW, DISTANT COUSIN OF SAUL.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ah, good old Hollar Bellow. All I remember about him is all those bright colors he employed in his art. That guy's art was loud.

      Delete
  2. I'm imagining a bird called a "nightyeller". It would not look at all like a nightingale. :-)

    Hollar Bellow is Saul's cousin who moved to Appalachia, I think.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Perhaps Hollar Bellow is out searching for the endangered Appalachian Nightyeller.

      Delete